by Perry McDaid I recently uploaded ‘Accentuate The Positive’ song to add an amusing slant to a discussion on reviewing while making a salient point. And it IS a good point. Reviewing a piece is like making music, and particularly that piece which is about life. If we don’t woo the potentially great writers with our ballads, we’re going to remain stuck in this mire of “celebrity autobiographies” and formulaic twaddle. So get that tuning fork out and practice your crooning. I recently noticed a newbie to YWO getting a mite frustrated and discouraged and decided to step in, sending…
by Perry McDaid Writing tip, eh? Well what can one say that hasn’t been said already? I suppose the most pertinent point I encountered in my studies was the concept of a sense of manners. Too many people tend towards the style of their heroes, or the classics – thinking that this will ensure that their opus is a quality work. Notice the overindulgence in words here born of being weaned on suchlike? A “sense of manners” is where you not only give your characters personality, but provide one for your book by breaking away from the natural leaning towards…
ANNOUNCEMENT - PLEASE READ When I logged in this morning, the home page wouldn't take my login information, showing me as not logged in. However, when I switch to any of the other pages, all seems well. I need to go to work today, so I won't be able to work on this issue until later. I think I've fixed it - it was a cache problem, however, if you have problems: log in as usual, and then just switch over to a different page, such as the forum. Sorry for the inconvenience. Sue
by Sandra Miller (reprinted with permission) Writers are notorious for their love of words. Because of that, we often have a hard time learning to consider certain words as enemies. Here are some words that can suck the impact out of your writing. Watch out for empty words in your writing. All forms of "to be" are really empty words--my personal nemesis is the word "was". The word "was" is a sign of the dreaded passive voice. It introduces a distance between you and your reader, bumping them out of the story and back into the chair. Sometimes "was" is…
Key lesson: Be sure your work has context. Metaphor and symbolism might give the literary depth necessary to answer the vital question “So what?” As poets and writers, we should always put ourselves in the shoes of the readers and ask the question, “So what?” or “Why should I care?” about this work. Sometimes we authors fall in love with our writing and miss the reason for it or it might be so personal and exclusive that the reader might not be able to connect to it. If there is context, then there might be sufficient literary depth to have…
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