Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell Reposted with permission by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 28th, 2014 at 8:09 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Good writing techniques by Brandon M Johnson From Rick: This week’s delightful and advice-filled blog post was originally submitted as an article on writing to Silver Blade magazine. Unfortunately, that magazine recently changed its editorial polices and no longer accepts such articles. However, we felt that the article deserved an audience because it lays out the elements of a good story in a concise, to-the-point way. Besides, with that…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 14th, 2014 at 9:06 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Good writing techniques Reposted with permission From Rick: “Write Well, Write to Sell” is pleased to welcome Kellee Kranendonk as a contributor. Kellee, a native of Canada (in case you’re wondering about the occasional divergent spellings of some words in her post), has been a frequent contributor to Silver Blade magazine, which recently changed its format. Karl Rademacher, Silver Blade’s publisher approached me about switching Kellee’s articles over to Write Well, where…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 7th, 2014 at 9:54 PM Posted In: General, Novel writing, Story Details Reposted with permission From Scott: The television show CSI has moved fingerprint investigation into the forefront of many stories of crime fiction. It seems like on every episode of the popular TV series, the investigators magically uncover a fingerprint, and thirty minutes later the crime is solved. Unfortunately, reality follows a starkly different path. Fingerprints are hard to come by, quality fingerprints even more so, and usually at that point…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 24th, 2014 at 8:44 PM Posted In: Novel writing, Story Details Reposted with permission From Scott: Last time, our discussion on death scenes included suicides, accidental deaths, and natural deaths. In this week’s blog, we’ll take a look at questionable deaths and homicide scenes. The questionable death scene is a difficult one. Often, there are no obvious signs of trauma on the body and no obvious mechanism of death. It might even be unclear how the body came to be where it is. These cases are treated as homicides until we find…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 17th, 2014 at 7:53 PM Posted In: Promotion & Marketing Reposted with permission From Rick: Once again, we’re cross-posting some great advice from the 13Thirty Books blog. This time, Rich Devin shares some tips on how to improve your sales at book signings. Now, we realize that these are somewhat rare events at bookstores for indie authors, but they don’t have to be at bookstores. And some of Rich’s tips can be extended and applied to marketing in general with the idea of improving your chances at getting noticed. It’s all about…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 10th, 2014 at 8:20 PM Posted In: Novel writing, Story Details Reposted with permission From Scott: At the end of the previous installment, I discussed various methods for determining how long a person has been dead. This time, we’re going to take a look at the manner of death: suicide, accidental, and natural. In a typical case of natural death, the signs are obvious. In fact, our department policy is that if the death appears completely natural to the responding officer (and to the attending emergency medical personnel), the crime scene unit…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on February 24th, 2014 at 7:36 PM Posted In: Novel writing, Story Details Reposted with permission From Scott: A commonly asked question, both at real crime scenes and at those from the world of fiction, is this: how long has the victim been dead? A variety of tools is available to investigators who are looking to answer that very question. However, sometimes the methods described by fiction authors fall short of reality. Let’s take a look at some ways we can get to the truth on this matter. Keep in mind that many of…
by Write Well, Write To Sellon February 17th, 2014 at 8:41 PM Posted In: Good writing techniques, Point of view Reposted with permission. From Rick: Last week I talked about head-hopping in terms of POV. As a refresher, head hopping refers to slipping out of the viewpoint of whichever character is narrating a scene and slipping into the viewpoint of another character in the scene, one whose thoughts and feelings the starting POV character cannot know. I also discussed how this differs from the omniscient POV. In that POV, an external narrator is telling the story and is therefore able…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on February 10th, 2014 at 8:55 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Point of view Reposted with Permission From Rick: In two previous posts here (July 9, 2012 and July 23, 2012), I talked a little about point of view (POV), specifically first person and how to choose the best POV for the story. Point of view is a lengthy and complex subject in writing, in part because there are so many possible POVs one can write in. Every story is told from the perspective of one or more narrators. Whoever is narrating the…
by Write Well, Write To Sell on February 4th, 2014 at 9:03 PM Posted In: Novel writing, Story Details Reposted with permission From Scott: Last time, I talked about the functions and duties of the Coroner’s office, including the work done by the Forensic Pathologist. In this installment, I’ll move forward into police procedures when investigating the death scene. First, I would like to take a moment to discuss what we call the “CSI Effect.” The popular television series, which has spawned its share of spin-off series, demonstrates the capabilities of the crime scene investigator. But in the process, the…
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