Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on December 8th, 2014 at 9:03 PM Posted In: Dialog From Rick: I know, I know. I’m doing dialog posts with astonishing slowness even for me, but I’ll get to the end of them one of these weeks… or months… or years. This particular post in the series began with a recent blog post from Anne R. Allen (a great blog, by the way): 8 BOGUS RULES NEW WRITERS TELL EACH OTHER Specifically, it began with Anne Allen’s bogus point #3: “‘”Said’ is boring.…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on November 3rd, 2014 at 9:16 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Point of view From Rick: “Why would I want to write in second person?” you ask. “Well, maybe because you can capture a voice, mood and tone with it that no other viewpoint can,” I reply. Before I answer that in detail, let’s first understand exactly what the second-person viewpoint is—and what it isn’t. The excerpt below is from the first, and most famous, novel to be written in second person: Bright…
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Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on October 28th, 2014 at 4:35 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, General From Rick: An interesting question came up recently with regard to authoritative advice for writers. It’s a fair question. With so many books and blogs out there, who should we believe and trust when it comes to advice? Further, what qualifies a person to give such advice? In my October 6, 2014 blog post, I talked about the accepted authorities for spelling and grammar. That was a much easier topic to…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on October 20th, 2014 at 7:50 PM Posted In: Story Details From Scott: After a much-needed hiatus, I have returned to revisit the topic of fingerprints. If you recall from my earlier entries on the subject, we discussed what makes up a fingerprint, how they form, biologically speaking, on your skin, and the various methods we have for developing them. In this entry, we’ll get more into the technical side, showing how a fingerprint identification is actually made. If you’re writing a crime novel,…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on October 13th, 2014 at 6:50 PM Posted In: Openings From Rick: A couple of years back, Scott and I did a five-part series on Openings. If you want to read (or re-read) those, the OPENINGS category on the left side of the blog page will let you find them quickly. That category also includes a couple of other articles related to openings, which in my opinion, one can never write too much about. After all, your opening–along with your title and book cover–is…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on October 6th, 2014 at 9:15 PM Posted In: Basics of writing From Rick: Two weeks ago, I did a joint blog post with Kellee Kranendonk on some basics of grammar and spelling. One of my writer friends from Ireland was quick to point out an error of sorts in my statement that the Merriam-Webster dictionary was the considered authority on spelling and usage. And he’s right: that was an error on my part. I have corrected the blog post to specify US English…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on September 29th, 2014 at 8:53 PM Posted In: Basics of writing From Rick: Last year I did a post on verb tenses. Recently a question came up regarding this subject, and I saw that the previous post had not covered this particular issue. MASTERING VERB TENSES IN YOUR WRITING–Part 1 In that post I discussed past tense narratives and gave an example of slipping between past and present tense, but I did not talk about writing narratives in present tense. I have mentioned…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on September 22nd, 2014 at 8:49 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Confusing words, Editing by Rick Taubold and Kellee Kranendonk From Rick: For this week’s blog, I decided to build on another great article Kellee wrote for Silver Blade magazine. What I’m going to do is use Kellee’s article as a base, selectively choosing relevant pieces of it, and adding my own stuff in with it. I’ll try to give Kellee the credit for her parts. KELLEE: There can’t be enough articles on…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on September 15th, 2014 at 9:10 PM Posted In: Guest posts, Promotion & Marketing by Kellee Kranendonk From Rick: This post is an excellent follow-up to Kellee’s post last week on crafting a marketable story. Here, Kellee gives you some ideas on how to categorize the story you’ve just written. This can be important both when trying to sell your story to a publisher/magazine or if you self-publish. Putting your story in the right category or categories will help potential readers to find your…
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