An enlightening article by guest writer David Craig (Neil Glass) In 2004, I wrote a whistle-blowing book RIP-OFF! The Scandalous Inside Story of the Management Consulting Money Machine. I sent the book to all the main literary agents and got enough pre-printed refusal letters to wallpaper a medium-sized house. But just as I was about to give up, one agent actually read my book and offered to represent me. (The fact that this agent takes the time to look at all submissions, however awful many of them are, may be the reason this agent has been the world’s best-selling agent…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on May 25th, 2015 at 7:27 PM Posted In: Story Details PROPER USE OF THE LEGAL SYSTEM IN FICTION From Scott: After an extended (and unintentional) blogging absence, I’ve returned with a series on criminal legal processes. These entries will offer some guidance to writers who wish to include criminal proceedings in their writing and to do so with a degree of accuracy. As a disclaimer, I would like you to keep in mind that this will all be based upon Illinois criminal law.…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on May 18th, 2015 at 8:28 PM Posted In: Bad writing habits, Basics of writing From Rick: I received some interesting comments on the previous post on this topic from my good friend and a fellow Director of Silver Pen Perry McDaid. Perry pointed out that I had erred in my statement “We generally don’t talk while engaged in violent action.” I had also said that dialogue and actions shown as happening almost simultaneously is not a reasonable expectation. After thinking about this and…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on May 4th, 2015 at 9:44 PMPosted In: Self-Publishing, Traditional publishing and data to back them up. From Rick: A couple of months back, my friend Adam Fenner, who had been a guest blogger on here before, did a series of blogs on his website about the publishing industry and self-publishing. I was going to extract his blogs and repost them here, but I recently learned that this is a bad idea. I found this out when I asked permission from a blogger to…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 27th, 2015 at 9:29 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Story Details From Rick: The best good description should be as transparent to the reader as possible, meaning it should blend with the story, not stand out from it. Well-written description can be so compelling that the reader experiences rather than sees the scene. If the reader is more than lightly aware of the description, then it’s not done right. Good description is like good art: it should have a focal point,…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 14th, 2015 at 9:46 PM Posted In: Bad writing habits, Basics of writing From Rick: Exactly what do I mean by “writing in afterthoughts?” Consider this short scenario: (1) “How dare you call me a slut!” Sheila said, grabbing a plate and throwing it at me. “Well, what would you call having sex with my roommate after I went to work? Pity sex? So he wouldn’t feel left out?” I said, ducking, the plate hitting the floor behind me and shattering.
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on April 6th, 2015 at 8:31 PM Posted In: Self-Publishing, Traditional publishing From Rick: I know that I was going to blog only every other week until the end of April, but after reading over the two previous blogs on self-publishing, Scott Gamboe offered some additional thoughts from his experiences. Being short, I figured I’d slip this one in. From Scott: I checked with Borders when my first book (traditionally published) hit the shelves (in 2006). Their website allowed you to select any store…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 30th, 2015 at 8:23 PM Posted In: Self-Publishing, Traditional publishing Last time, I tried to give the definitions and explanation of the various publishing outlets available today. In this part I want to look at some of the reasons new authors believe that traditional publishing is the only way to go. All the time I hear the same reasons why authors want to seek out traditional publishers. All of these are myths, and I’ll explain why they are point by point. (POINT…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 17th, 2015 at 9:30 PM Posted In: Self-Publishing, Traditional publishing From Rick: Three years ago, Scott did an excellent post on this topic. At the time, the “self-publishing revolution” was barely five years old, and in the minds of many would-be authors, the traditional publishing route was still the only credible way to get published. It’s time to revisit this. SCOTT’S ARTICLE In the past three years, self-publishing has become more respectable. The sad part is that authors who believe traditional publishing…
Read the original article at Write Well, Write to Sell by Write Well, Write To Sell on March 2nd, 2015 at 9:00 PM Posted In: Basics of writing, Story Details guest post by Kellee Kranendonk From Rick: Once again, I’m pleased to have Kellee Kranendonk as a guest on our blog. This time, Kellee provides us with a simply superb post on description wherein she answers the question, How much description do you really need? My answer is that you need however much as it takes to inform your reader and keep him/her interested in reading the descriptions without wanting…
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